English 3, Quarter 4 Lesson Plans

Teacher:           Ms. Ellis                                               Robert Morgan Educational Center
Grade Level & Subject: 11th Grade/ English 3
Lesson and/or Unit: The Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby
Amount of Time: 10 Weeks
LAFS:

LAFS.1112.L.1.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
LAFS.1112.L.2.3.a Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.
LAFS.1112.L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
LAFS.1112.L.3.4.a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
LAFS.1112.L.3.4.c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
LAFS.1112.L.3.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
LAFS.1112.L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
LAFS.1112.RI.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RI.1.2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RI.1.3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
LAFS.1112.RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
LAFS.1112.RI.2.5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
LAFS.1112.RI.2.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
LAFS.1112.RI.3.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
LAFS.1112.RI.4.10 By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RL.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
LAFS.1112.RL.2.5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
LAFS.1112.RL.3.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.b Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.d Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
LAFS.1112.W.1.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
LAFS.1112.W.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
LAFS.1112.W.1.2.b Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
LAFS.1112.W.1.3.c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
LAFS.1112.W.1.3.d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
LAFS.1112.W.2.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
Student Learning Objective: The student will be able to read The Great Gatsby and determine the importance of The Jazz Age. Students will also be able to critically analyze the text for author’s purpose, character motivations, historical contexts, social justice issues of the 1920s, and syntax.
Assessment For Learning (Summative or Formative):

  • Research paper/ Documented Essay: Argumentative Essay (Summative)
  • Portfolio Reflection Assessment
  • Peer Assessment
  • Oral Assessment/ Discussion Participation
  • Project-based Presentation/ Assessment
  • Timed Writing Assessment
  • Standardized Test Practice Assessment
  • Analytical Reading Log/ Dialectical Journal
  • Other:

By Week:

  • 1: Crucible Comparative Essay
  • 2: Salem Witch Trials vs. McCarthyism
  • 3: Gatsby Treasure Hunt
  • 4: Gatsby Reading Questions
  • 5: Great Gatsby Vocabulary Quiz
  • 6: Great Gatsby Vocabulary Quiz
  • 7: Thank-You Letter Project
  • 8: The Great Gatsby Literature Journal
  • 9: Career/ College Research Project
  • 10: Finalized Digital Portfolio
Characteristics of the Exemplary Work Product/Lesson Outcome: see FSA Writing Rubric
Key/Essential Questions: Why was the Jazz Age such a crucial time in American History? How are the effects of the Jazz Age seen in today’s society?

 

Key/Academic Vocabulary: See Gatbsy Vocabulary Sheet
Materials/Items Needed: The Gatsby book
Bellringer/Engage:

  • Grammar Practice
  • Reading Practice
  • Journal/ Writing Practice
  • Group Discussion
  • Vocabulary Practice
  • Other:
Activities: 

Week 31: Weekly Inspiration, NRI Appositives & Active/ Passive Voice Practice, Typed copy of Crucible Comparative essay is due, Capitalization of titles help, Presentations of Crucible Parallels Group Project.

Week 32: Opening: “How to Marry a Millionaire” clip,  Begin The Great Gatsby, Khan Academy: Social Sciences, NRI Practice: Capitalization/ Formatting Titles & Commas,  NRI: Quiz (Appositives & Active/ Passive Voice)

Week 33: Weekly Inspiration, The Great Gatsby, NRI Quiz: Capitalization/ Formatting Titles & Commas, No additional NRI practice this week!

Week 34: Weekly Inspiration, Continue The Great Gatsby, NOTE: Instruction will be interrupted by testing

Week 35: Weekly Inspiration, Finish The Great Gatsby, Comparison Assignment: Film vs. Novel, NOTE: Instruction will be interrupted by testing

Week 36: Weekly Inspiration, Gatsby Journals DUE (May 16), Gatsby Vocabulary Quizzes/ Presentations, Socratic Circle Discussion: The Great Gatsby, Thank-You Letters, Work on Digital Portfolios, NOTE: Instruction will be interrupted by testing

Week 37: Weekly Inspiration, Work on Digital Portfolios (Add certificates, final essays/ projects),  College Research Project, NOTE: Instruction will be interrupted by testing

Week 38: May 30th= Memorial Day, Weekly Inspiration, Complete digital portfolios, End of Year Celebration (June 1/2)

Week 39: Celebrate, Bellringer (Plan: How Can I Continue to Grow Intellectually Over the Summer to Prepare for Senior Year?)Educational Film, Final Grades

Differentiation Notes: Technology Integration
Honors/ Students Who Passed the FSA:

  1. New SAT Overview: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/new-sat/new-sat-tips-planning/new-sat-about-sat/v/walk-through-sat-practice-platform
  2. www.hmhfyi.com Extended Activities
  • No Red Ink
  • Khan Academy New SAT Prep
  • ThinkCERCA
  • Padlet
  • Kahoot!
  • Word Processing
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Resources
  • Graphics/Charts
  • Internet Research
  • Web Cam
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Class Dojo
  • Remind
  • Teacher Website
  • Movie/ Film
  • Other:
ESE (IEP/ 504)

  •  Extended time
ELL

  •  Extended time
Other: as stated in IEP or 504
Teacher Strategies – Best Practices

  • Student choice
  • Teacher modeling
  • Cooperative learning
  • Hands-on learning/ manipulatives utilized
  • Small group
  • Higher-ordering thinking skills
  • Real-world connections
  • Criteria charts created (student-driven; supports learning by defining and clarifying a task )
  • Rubrics created (student-centered)
  • Mentor texts
  • Anchor charts (a reference tool that “anchors” new and ongoing learning to key concepts previously introduced)
  • Research/research materials
  • Evidence of assessment for learning (teacher modifies instruction based on students’ understanding)
  • Socratic Circle/ Seminar
  • Other:

 Reading Skills

  • Annotation
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize
  • Chronology/ Timeline
  • Literary Element Analysis
  • Questioning
  • Prediction
  • TPCASTT
  • SOAPSTONE
  • Independent Reading
  • Writing before and after reading
  • Implementing pre, post, or during reading activities
  • Teaching metacognitive strategies/reading strategies
  • Classroom/Literacy library

Vocabulary Skill

  • Greek/ Latin Roots
  • Analogies
  • Context Clues
  • Synonyms/ Antonyms
  • Prefixes/ Roots/ Suffixes

Writing Skill

  • Literary Analysis
  • Pre-Writing
  • Revision/ Peer Editing
  • Reflection/ Self Analysis
  • Informational/ Explanatory
  • Persuasive/ Argumentative
  • Narrative
  • Writing workshop time
  • Teaching grammar and mechanics in context
  • Conferencing
  • Other

 HW: See REMIND posts.

 

English 3, Quarter 3 Lesson Plans

Teacher:           Ms. Ellis                                               Robert Morgan Educational Center
Grade Level & Subject: 11th Grade/ English 3
Lesson and/or Unit: HMH Collections 6: The Modern World (The Crucible)
Amount of Time: 10 Weeks
 *Schedule changes based on testing.
LAFS:

LAFS.1112.RL.3.7- Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

LAFS.1112.RI.1.3- Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

LAFS.1112.W.1.2.- Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

LAFS. 1112.W.2.5- Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 11–12 on page 54.)

LAFS.1112.W.2.6.-  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

LAFS. 1112.SL.1.1.- Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

LAFS. 1112.L.1.2.- Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

LAFS. 1112.WHST.3.7- Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Student Learning Objective: The student will be able to analyze the selections in the collection in terms of an historical context.

Objectives by Text: The student will be able to…

  • Winter Dreams”- analyze character motivations in a short story and support their inferences about those motivations with evidence from the text.
  • The Harlem Rennaissance: Poems by Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, & Arna Bontemps- analyze and compare multiple works from a time period on the basis of topic and theme
  • Narrative Poetry: “Mending Wall” & “The Death of the Hired Man”- analyze the structure and language of poetry
  • The Crucible– identify and analyze elements of a drama
    • film- analyze audio and fim productions of a play for theme and characterization
Assessment For Learning (Summative or Formative):

  • Research paper/ Documented Essay: Comparative Essay (Formative)
  • Portfolio Reflection Assessment
  • Peer Assessment
  • Oral Assessment/ Discussion Participation
  • Project-based Presentation/ Assessment
  • Timed Writing Assessment
  • Standardized Test Practice Assessment
  • Analytical Reading Log/ Dialectical Journal
  • Other:

By Week:

  • 1: Phase 1: Digital Portfolio
  • 2: The Tempest Essays
  • 3: Literature Test: Winter Dreams, Harlem Renaissance, Narrative Poetry
  • 4: Reading Collaboration Group Assignment
  • 5: Harlem Renaissance Petry/ Narrative Poetry Circle
  • 6: The Crucible Packet
  • 7: The Crucible Comparative Essay First Draft
  • 8: Act 1: The Crucible Illustrative Relationships
  • 9: Khan Academy SAT Reading: Science Practice
  • 10: NRI: 3rd Quarter Grammar Test
Characteristics of the Exemplary Work Product/Lesson Outcome: see FSA Writing Rubric
Key/Essential Questions: How did Americans respond to modern life in a globally connected world?
Key/Academic Vocabulary: HMH Collections  p.410 (digital bk)

  1. comtemporary
  2. global
  3. infinite
  4. simulated
  5. virtual

*Other words based on each individual text.

Materials/Items Needed:

  • The 3 A.M. Epiphany by Brian Kiteley
  • HMH Collection 6 (digital or copies made by teacher)
  • McDougal Littel Text (The Crucible)
  • HMH Common Core Writing 10-11th Grade
  • No Red Ink Website
  • Khan Academy Website
Bellringer/Engage:

  • Grammar Practice
  • Reading Practice
  • Journal/ Writing Practice
  • Group Discussion
  • Vocabulary Practice
  • Weekly Inspiration
Activities: 

Week 1: Weekly Inspiration. Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken.” NRI: Third Quarter Grammar Diagnostic (Due: Sun.). Restrategize: Goal- Setting for second semester of junior year. Begin Collection 6: The Modern World in Collaborative Study Groups Days 1 & 2. Start reading/ note taking- “Winter Dream”- by Fitzgerald.

Week 2: Weekly Eye-Opener. Finish “Winter Dream”- Fitzgerald. Reading Collaborative Groups: Collection 6 Days 3 & 4 “Winter Dream” Collaborative Discussion, “Analyzing the Text” #8 & 9, “Performance Task” #1-2 (work in pairs), “Critical Vocabulary” p. 436. NRI: Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Practice. Khan Academy SAT Practice.

Week 3: Weekly Inspiration. Complete “Winter Dream” assignments. Reading Collaborative Groups: Collections 6 Day 5: The Harlem Renaissance. Continue NRI: Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Practice.

Week 4: Weekly Inspiration.  Retakers: Timed Essay in Class (Cuba Embargo). Collection #6: Day 6- Narrative Poetry- Robert Frost. Review NRI: Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Practice. Take NRI: Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Quiz. ONLY 3 DAYS OF SCHOOL! SEE CALENDAR. 

Weeks 5: Weekly Inspiration, Review first part of Collection 6. First Collection 6 Test: Winter’s Dream, The Harlem Renaissance, & Narrative Poetry. Original narrative poetry assignment + Poetry Sharing Circle.

Week 6: Weekly Inspiration, All- Star Digital Portfolio Examples. Correct Literature Test (Graded on my desk. DO NOT look at the correct answer sheet). NRI Quiz: MLA Citation Review Quiz.  Salem Witchcraft Background/ Begin The Crucible.  NRI Embedding Quotations 3rd Quarter Practice (HW).

Week 7: Weekly Inspiration #1 & #2,  Day 3 & 4 of Collection 6: The Crucible

Week 8: Weekly Inspiration,  Weekly Inspiration, NRI: Hyphens Practice,  Day 5 of Collection 6: The Crucible.  NRI: Embedding Quotations Quiz (3rd Quarter).

Week 9: Weekly Inspiration, NRI: Third Quarter Grammar Review, Day 6 -8 of Collection 6: The Crucible, Student Groups: Khan Academy, Reading: Science Practice, NRI: Hyphens Quiz (3rd Quarter)

Week 10: Weekly Inspiration, NRI: Third Quarter Grammar Test, Days 9-10 of Collection 6: The Crucible, Mini Research Project Presentations, Khan Academy: History Practice, NRI: Commas for Formatting

 FSA Retaker Prep Schedule:

Week 1 (Feb 1): Gallery Walk to review writing types/ Review prompt analysis/ planning/ brainstorming

Week 2 (Feb. 8): Write essay with teacher from scratch (focus= thesis, organization)

Week 3 (Feb. 17): Review Ethos, Logos, Pathos & Fallacies/ Use in Writing

Week 4 (Feb. 22): Write essay with teacher from scratch (focus= elaboration, citing evidence)

Week 5 (Feb. 29): Timed Essay Writing

Week 6 (Mar. 7): Review timed essays and discuss correlation btw planning and final product

Week 7 (Mar. 14): Revising and Editing in a timed setting

SPRING BREAK- Timed FSA Practice Writing Test (Students send essays to Ms. Ellis)

Week 8 (Mar. 28): FSA RETAKES

Differentiation Notes: Technology Integration
Honors/ Students Who Passed the FSA:

  1. New SAT Overview: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/new-sat/new-sat-tips-planning/new-sat-about-sat/v/walk-through-sat-practice-platform
  2. www.hmhfyi.com Extended Activities
  • No Red Ink
  • Khan Academy New SAT Prep
  • ThinkCERCA
  • Padlet
  • Kahoot!
  • Word Processing
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Resources
  • Graphics/Charts
  • Internet Research
  • Web Cam
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Class Dojo
  • Remind
  • Teacher Website
  • Movie/ Film
  • Other:
ESE (IEP/ 504) & ELL

  •  Extended time
  • Other: as stated in IEP or 504
Teacher Strategies – Best Practices

  • Student choice
  • Teacher modeling
  • Cooperative learning
  • Hands-on learning/ manipulatives utilized
  • Small group
  • Higher-ordering thinking skills
  • Real-world connections
  • Criteria charts created (student-driven; supports learning by defining and clarifying a task )
  • Rubrics created (student-centered)
  • Mentor texts
  • Anchor charts (a reference tool that “anchors” new and ongoing learning to key concepts previously introduced)
  • Research/research materials
  • Evidence of assessment for learning (teacher modifies instruction based on students’ understanding)
  • Socratic Circle/ Seminar
  • Other:

Reading Skills

  • Annotation
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize
  • Chronology/ Timeline
  • Literary Element Analysis
  • Questioning
  • Prediction
  • TPCASTT
  • SOAPSTONE
  • Independent Reading
  • Writing before and after reading
  • Implementing pre, post, or during reading activities
  • Teaching metacognitive strategies/reading strategies
  • Classroom/Literacy library

Vocabulary Skill

  • Greek/ Latin Roots
  • Analogies
  • Context Clues
  • Synonyms/ Antonyms
  • Prefixes/ Roots/ Suffixes

Writing Skill

  • Literary Analysis
  • Pre-Writing
  • Revision/ Peer Editing
  • Reflection/ Self Analysis
  • Informational/ Explanatory
  • Persuasive/ Argumentative
  • Narrative
  • Writing workshop time
  • Teaching grammar and mechanics in context
  • Conferencing
  • Other

 HW: See REMIND posts.

Informational Essays

imgres.jpgAs we review informational writing, please copy the resources below into your Class Notebook.

Ms. Ellis’ Notes on Informational Essay Writing


 

Legend:

Any information that is grade specific will be highlighted in the appropriate color below.

10th Grade Specific

11th Grade Specific


 

images-2.jpg

Introductory Paragraphs

  • Expectations:

    1. Intriguing Hook (lead) that is unbiased. (1-2 sentences)

    2. Substantial background information that tells your audience about your topic. What is it? What is important to know prior to hearing your reasons? (2-3 sentences)

    3. Clear and concise thesis Statement (using the umbrella or list method). (1 sentence)

  • Resources:


Student Examples:imgres-1.jpg

Click below to see images of student examples and the in-class activities completed w/ Ms. Ellis.


 

images-1.jpg

(Yes, I do realize this picture contains a grammatical error. Live a little.)

Body Paragraphs

Expectations:

  1. Clear topic sentence or transitional sentence at the beginning of each paragraph including reason. (1 sentence)

  2. Explanation of reason.

  3. Evidence #1 to back up reason.

  4. Explanation of evidence #1.

  5. Evidence #2 to back up reason.

  6. Explanation of evidence #2.

  7. Evidence #3 to back up reason.

  8. Explanation of evidence #3.

  9. Clear and concise closing statement or transitional sentence that leads into next reason. (1 sentence)

  10. You must use 6-7 pieces of evidence in your entire essay. (Includes intro and conclusion). NOTE: 11th grade = 7-8 pieces

    • i.e.- You may have a quote for your hook (1), five pieces of evidence in your body paragraphs (5), end your conclusion with a notable quote (1) = 7 total pieces of textual evidence utilized in your essay.

  11. Vary the ways you integrate quotations in your essay.

    Essay Requirements

    (10th Grade= 6-7 pieces of textual evidence)

    Reg.- Use 3 types of quotation integration strategies & 1 paraphrased piece of evidence.

    -paraphrase (1)

    -explanatory phrase + comma (1)

    -complete sentence + colon (1)

    -make quotation part of  your sentence (1)

    Hon.- Use all types of quotation integration strategies & at least 1 paraphrased piece of evidence.

    (11th Grade= 7-8 pieces of textual evidence)

    1. Paraphrasing (2)

    2. Complete sentence w/ a colon (1)

    3. Explanatory phrase w/ comma (1)

    4. Make quote part of own sentence (2)

    5. Short quotations part of own sentence (2)

      Resources:

  • Cite Evidence Notes
  • Integrating Quotations

    • Reminders:

    • Thoreau ends his essay with a metaphor: “Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in.” Note the location of the period.

    • Thoreau ends his essay with a metaphor: “Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in” (paragraph 3). Note the location change of the period after citation.

    • Vary your tags! (Do not repeat “said”). i.e.- gasped, replied, stated, explained, informed, proclaimed, rebutted, suggested, etc.

    • Paraphrasing: Rule #1: Do NOT repeat the same keywords as the original author. Rule #2: Do NOT look at the quotation more than twice. If you stare at the author’s words too long, you will be unable to come up with your own original synonyms.

    • Know the difference:

      • Comma= ,

         (Use an introductory dependent clause prior to the comma)

        • If you use the word “that” you DO NOT use a comma.

      • Colon= :

           (Must be preceded by a complete sentence)

      • Semicolon= ;

        (May NOT be used to introduce a quotation)

    • When quoting poems, include the line break. i.e.- “Roses are red,/ Violets are blue…”

    • Only use an ellipsis (…) when it won’t change the meaning of the quotation.

    • In- Class Practice: (10th Grade)

  • Transition Words and Clauses

  • Transition Words List #2

  • Transition Sentences and Words- Student Copy


imgres-2.jpg

Concluding Paragraph

Expectations:

  1. Mirror your introduction’s hook. (optional)

  2. Restatement of your thesis. (1 sentence)

    • You must REWORD your thesis. Do not write your thesis statement in the exact same way!

  3. Recap major points in body paragraphs. (2-3 sentences)

    • DO NOT mention new information. This is a summary section.

  4. Discuss controlling idea and set it in a larger context. How will others be affected? OR Redefine key terms to help audience better understand your topic.

Resources:

  • Types of Conclusions

  • Look in the Student Examples section to see conclusions from your own peers.


Proofreading:c1c68270db939e7409533c26529216bb.jpg

  1. Do you have clear and concise Sentences?

  2. Writing Checklist

images-3.jpg

Directions: Revising your Fall Writing Interim

images-5.jpg

  1. Rewrite your essay based on the notes you received.

  2. I will review each portion of the essay and then you will rewrite just that piece.

  3. The following class I will check your rewrites and review the next section.

    • i.e.- I will teach introductory paragraphs; you will rewrite your introduction; I will check your revised introductory paragraph.

  4. By the end of the workshop, you will have revised your introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion.

  5. Type up the revised paragraphs into a final draft. Please use the following set up when typing.

    • Font= Times New Roman

    • Size of Font= 12 points

    • Line Spacing= Double Spaced

    • Header in Left- Hand Corner= Name, Teacher, Date, Period

    • Title of Essay= Centered in the Middle

    • Use this template for assistance: Student Essay Template

  6. Legend

      


 

Let’s Take It Digital!

  1. Upload your final essay onto your Digital Portfolio under “Informational Writing.”

Resume Workshop

Resume Picture

Creating a resume is one of the most important tasks you should learn in high school. Whether you’re asking your teacher for a recommendation or applying for a job, a stellar resume is the key to putting your best foot forward. Please use this page to help you draft and perfect your first resume. Note: Keeping  your resume current (up-to-date) is something you will have to do throughout your entire career.

Creating a Resume:

Step 1:

Take out a sheet of paper and brainstorm the following information:

  1. Objective

    • What kind of position do you hope to gain with this resume?

    • Although this section is not always mandatory, it is important to consider why you need the resume in the first place.

  2. Education

    • Where do you go to school?

    • What is your expected graduation date?

    • What is your current weighted/ unweighted GPA?

    • Any relevant classes that you want to highlight? (Place these in a separate section to make them stand out).

  3. Leadership

    • Think of any instances where you have held a leadership position.

      • Club officer? Special Leadership role within the classroom? Start your own business? Apart of the Student Government Association? Captain of your sports team or competition squad?

    • Now give that leadership role a title and tell your audience (using specific language) what you did in that leadership position.

    • Include dates of beginning and ending if possible.

  4. Employment

    • Brainstorm any official jobs you have held.

    • What was the company?

    • Where was the company located? (i.e.- city, state)

    • What was your position?

    • What did that position entail? (What did  you do?)

    • How long did you hold that position or are you currently still in it?

  5. Community Service

    • Have you given back to your community by doing philanthropic activities?

      • 5K Walk to Raise Money for Cancer Prevention, Donate clothes to Camillus House, Volunteer at a Soup Kitchen, Canned food drive for your Church?

    • What is the specific name of the event?

    • When did the event occur?

    • Where was the event?

    • What was your role? (coordinator, participant, cheer squad?)

    • How many hours did you volunteer?

  6. Skills

    • Languages

      • Are you bilingual? Multilingual? How many languages do you speak and are you fluent?

      • It is O.K. to say you have a working knowledge of a language. (i.e.- You know enough of the language to get by in a work environment, but you are not fluent like a native speaker.)

    • What computer skills do you possess?

      • Microsoft Suite Products (Word, Excel, etc.)?

      • Coding? (Be specific with which languages- Html, Java, C++)

      • Adobe Photoshop

      • It is important to think of everything you know. You are competing with individuals who are extremely tech savvy.

  7. References

    • Choose three (3) individuals who know your work ethic and can vouch for you if an employer calls.

    • Reach out and ask these three people BEFORE you put them on your resume.

    • Take down their full name, title (position), contact number, email address.

    • You can either choose to put your references at the bottom of your resume or say “References available upon request.”

Check out this sheet with keywords on page two.

Writing a Resume with Key Words

Step 2:

Type up your resume.

  1. Your header should be your name, address, professional email address, and best contact phone number.

  2. Ensure that it is in order.

  3. Use complete, clear, concise sentences.

  4. Choose an organizational style that highlights your strengths and downplays your weaknesses.

  5. Utilize keywords from the job application to draw the employer’s eyes to those skills.

Need Examples?

High School Resume Ex1 High School Resume Ex2 High School Resume Ex3

Adult Examples:

Lizek’s Resume

Stephens’ Resume

Step 3:

Write a cover letter.

  1. A cover letter is to inform your employer what position you are applying for.

  2. Sometimes your employer does not ask for a cover letter.

  3. In case they do, it is vital that you know how to write one.

    1. Be sure to address it properly.

    2. Know who to address it to. (Do your research!)

    3. Be clear about which position you are applying for.

    4. Highlight reasons why you are the ideal candidate.

    5. Do NOT make it too long.

  4. Need Examples?

Sample Resume Cover Letter

Step 4:

Proofread your resume at least five (5) times before you send it to a potential employer.

  • Have your parents, teachers, friends, proofread your resume! Get as many eyes looking for errors as possible.

  • It is a huge negative to have a typo on your resume.

Need more advice?

Take a look at these helpful articles.

“Top Recruiter Share 8 Things She Can Spot In a Resume”

cheatsheet

Macbeth

Macbeth image

Shakespeare’s Life and Works Group Project:

In class, you were separated into groups and tasked with researching a specific part of William Shakespeare’s life.

Directions: 

  1. Get into groups of 4 or 5. I need 5 groups total.

  2. Research your assigned topic using credible sites: PBS.org, Biography.com, History.com, etc.

  3. Create a Padlet including media (pics/ vids) for your assigned section.

  4. Sections:

    1. Shakespeare’s Childhood/ Schooling/ Upbringing

    2. Personal Life/ Marriages/ Kids

    3. Theater Career (Beginning/ Development

    4. Published Works/ Writing Style

    5. Death/ legacy

  5. Include a bibliography

    • Last name, first name. “Article, Pic/ Vid Title.” Site found. Date Accessed. Link.

    • Example


Resources

View the Shakespeare’s Life and Works group presentation notes here: Links to Presentations by Period.

Macbeth Packet: Second Quarter Unit- Macbeth.

Macbeth Audio: Click here to listen to the entire Macbeth play.

Full list of Elizabethan Terms: Elizabethan Language Terms RWT

NOTE: We are reading Macbeth through the digital textbook. Please go to www.my.hrw.com and log into your account or access it through your Dadeschools portal.

Students: the Macbeth packet has been uploaded into your Class Notebook via the handout tab.  Please copy the document and upload it into a separate tab.


Need Help Understanding Macbeth?

(Side note: There is a bit of foul language; however the analysis is stellar.)

Try this video.


Macbeth Performances

Date of Performances: February 8-11, 2016

(Please check the list below for the date of your group’s performance.)

You must come prepared to present on your assigned day.

List of Performers

 

How will you be graded?

Macbeth Rubric SS

Scoring System

16-14= A

13-11= B

10- 8= C

7-5= D

4-0= F

Start Practicing

What are some things to keep in mind as you practice your chosen Macbeth scenes?

  1. All parts must be memorized! Only for extreme circumstances, I have allowed students to use note cards. During your performance, you will be allowed to ask for a line to be read for you if you absolutely need it, but every time you use a line reader, your grade will decline.

  2. Props/Staging: What kind of props are you going to use? Fake swords (NO REAL KNIVES), cloaks, make up, etc.  How will you decorate the front of the classroom to bring your classmates into Macbeth‘s world? Your job is to make it as realistic as possible. Do not go out and purchase a ton of materials. Utilize the items you have at home and get creative.

  3. Where will your group practice? You have a full two weeks to prepare. Choose a location either at school or off campus that you can practice your lines. The more you practice, the better your performance, the higher your grade. I also recommend videotaping yourselves so you can see what your mistakes are prior to coming to class.

  4. Practice. Practice. Practice. AND Practice.


     

The Tempest

The Tempest

During the second quarter, we will be analyzing William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. All of your resources can be found below.


The Tempest Packet


 

Free PDF of the Play: http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/tempest/TempestText11.html


Free Sound Files of the Play: https://librivox.org/the-tempest-by-william-shakespeare/


 

Analysis Questions- Collaborative Study Groups

Act 1, Scene 1 (see digital text for line numbers

  1. What is personified in lines 16-17 and what impact does this personification have on the scene/ characters?
  2. Read lines 51-54 and infer what is happening. Provide evidence for your inference.
  3. Analyze Language: Determine the meaning of line 53. Explain your reasoning process. (see line above)
  4. Analyze Language: Read Gonzalo’s speech. (lines 65-68)Cite instances of alliteration and assonance. (Alliteration: repetition of initial consonants/ Assonance: repetition of vowel sounds)

Act 1, Scene 2 (see digital text for line numbers)

  1. Reread lines 1-24. What do you learn about the shipwreck and about Prospero? What text evidence helped you make these inferences?
  2. Analyze Language: Read lines 1-5. Which line is written in perfect iambic pentameter? Identify that line and mark the stressed/ unstressed symbols and meters.
  3.  Cite Text Evidence: Review Prospero’s explanation of events in lines 79-105. What can you infer about Prospero’s role in Antonio’s rise to power and on what evidence can you base your inferences?
  4. Support Inferences/ Draw Conclusions: Look for evidence of Antonio’s point of view. What can you infer from this evidence about Antonio’s possible reason for taking over Milan? (lines 110-112)
  5. Personification: Closely read Prospero’s description of being put out to sea (lines 145-152). Find an example of personification in this passage. Write it down. Explain what is ironic about  the wind’s pity.
  6. Analyze Language: What sound device does Shakespeare use in Ariel’s greeting? (lines 191-192) How does this contribute to the effect of the lines?
  7. Describe Prospero’s relationship with Ariel as revealed in this passage (lines 253-280). Cite evidence for your inferences.
  8. To what does Prospero compare Caliban? What kind of figurative language is this an example of? What does it reveal about Prospero’s attitude to Caliban? (lines 285-286)
  9. Cite Evidence: Reread lines 443-457. Find evidence that supports your previous inferences about Prospero’s plan: that Prospero had Ariel lead Ferdinand to them so that he and Miranda would fall in love, eventually making Miranda queen and helping Prospero gain power over his brother.
  10. Analyze Miranda’s metaphor on lines 462-464. To what is Miranda comparing Ferdinand? Paraphrase her argument.
  11. Reread lines 486-500. Is Prospero please with the way his plan is progressing and how can you tell?

Let’s Review: 

Comparing Text and Media

Choose a partner:

  • Jot down how your view the following characters (physical characteristics/ personality):
    • Prospero
    • Miranda
    • Caliban

The Tempest BBC Video Clip

  • Are the characters in the film what you imagined? With a partner, discuss how they are similar to or different from what you pictured while reading the play. Cite specific images from the video to support your ideas.

The Tempest Production Images

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

  • What conclusions can you draw about this version of the play based on these images? With a partner, discuss what interests you about this film version and what you might like or dislike about it. Cite specific evidence from the photographs to support your ideas.

Analysis Section:

  • Compare:
    • Reread lines 309-378 in the text. Describe Prospero’s traits as revealed through his dialogue in the play. Drawing from what you have seen in the clip and in the images, explain how in each film Prospero/ Prospera does or does not demonstrate these qualities.
  • Synthesize:
    • What are the advantages of seeing more than one version of the same Shakespearean drama? Explain.

Socratic Circle Discussion: Dig Deeper

  • How is the central idea in Shakespeare’s The Tempest  applicable to real- life? Discuss the value of the play and whether it is significant to twenty-first century classrooms.
    • Pay close attention during the Socratic Circle discussion and take notes. Your argumentative essays will answer  the aforementioned question.
  • Some items to consider:
    • What is the central idea in The Tempest?
    • What literary elements make the play stand out?
    • How are character developments throughout the play significant?
    • In what way is the setting vital to the meaning of the play?
  • Articles Used In Socratic Circle Discussion:
  • Socratic Circle Notes:

 

The Tempest Performances

Updated Directions:

Each of you have been placed into groups (see below). Create a video of your group members acting out your Shakespearean scene using a video feature on your cell phone or other technological device. You will upload your video to Ms. Ellis’ Teacher YouTube Channel by January 20, 2016. Please remember: Your group must speak in Elizabethan English, memorize your lines, and utilize props/ wardrobe specific to the time period. Please edit your video to delete any unnecessary acting takes.

Groups

Period 4:

Act 1

  • Scene 1: Viviana (Boatswain), Sallina (Master), Ivan (Sebastian), Emily W. (Alonso), Andre (Antonio), Chloe (Gonzalo)

Act 2

  • Scene 1: Anthony (Alonso), Jonathan (Sebastian), Cecilia (Antonio), Matt (Gonzalo), Jocelyn (Adrian), Ian (Francisco), Emily S. (Ariel), Sujeiby (Narrator)
  • Scene 2: Madelyn (Stephano), Judy (Trinculo), Jauko (Caliban)

Act 3

  • Scene 1: Lazaro (Prospero), Renata (Miranda), Jorge (Ferdinand)

Act 4

  • Scene 1: Alysia (Ariel), Oshane (Prospero), Alex (Ferdinand), Roman (Juno), Carolina (Miranda/ Trinculo), Bianni (Ceres/ Stephano), Joneilly (Iris/ Caliban)

Act 5

  • Epilogue: Reethwan (Prospero)

Period 6:

Act 1

  • Scene 1: Yozandriz (Master), Stephanie (Boatswain/ Antonio), George (Alonso), Devonte (Sebastian), Justin (Gonzalo/ Mariners)

Act 2

  • Scene 2: Maydane (Caliban), Leslie (Stephano), Chris (Trinculo)

Act 3

  • Scene 1: Prince (Prospero), Zach (Ferdinand), Sherayen (Miranda)
  • Scene 2: Alejandro (Stephano), Xavier (Caliban), Alex (Trinculo), Andrea (Ariel)
  • Scene 3: Nicole (Alonso), Noemi (Conzalo), Paula (Antonio), Jonathan (Francisco), Dixon (Sebastian), Ashley (Adrian)

Act 4

  • Scene 1: Gabriella (Iris), N’Ya (Ariel), Shawaynia (Miranda), Imani (Ceres), Amanda (Caliban), Spencer (Stephano), Sergio (Trinculo), Diamond (Prospero)

Act 5

How will your presentations be graded?

Your presentations will be graded using the rubric presented in your Tempest packet. If you lost it, please see below.

Tempest Performance Rubric

Each student in class will give feedback on their peers’ performances, and I will take your comments into consideration when I calculate final grades.

Planning for your Presentations:

  1. Choose a scene and the appropriate amount of group members from Ms. Ellis.
  2. Get in your groups and plan your performance.
    • Who has a video camera or a phone with an excellent video app?
    • Where will everyone meet to film the scene? When?
    • What will each character wear throughout the play? Will they need to change at any time?
    • What props will you use and who is in charge of getting/ making them?
    • How much time does everyone have to memorize their lines before you film?
    • Who will edit the video to make it ready for viewing?
    • Who is responsible for sending the video to Ms. Ellis?
  3. Practice! Practice! Practice!
    • Practice together as much as possible prior to filming!
    • Everyone gets an individual grade for their performance.
  4. Film/ edit your Shakespearean scene.
  5. Add a credits page to your video. If you are not technologically savvy, and cannot figure out how to add a slide to your video, please have your group members introduce themselves at the beginning of your video.
  6. Create a group name and share your edited video with msdrellis@gmail.com.
  7. Ms. Ellis will upload your video to her YouTube page.

The Tempest Essay Assignment:

Due: January 22, 2016

Directions:

Discuss the value of the play, The Tempest, and whether it is significant to twenty-first century classrooms. Are the themes applicable to modern day society? Or are they too antiquated? Argue whether or not the play should still be studied in educational settings. Within your argument, be sure to reference the two of the three readings from our Socratic Circle discussion, the BBC video clip, and “The Tempest” (2010) movie pictures. Your essay must include three (3) counterarguments and three (3) rebuttals.

Grading:

Essays will be graded using our argumentative writing rubric.

 

 

English 3 Quarter 2 Lesson Plans

Teacher:           Ms. Ellis                                               Robert Morgan Educational Center
Grade Level & Subject: 11th Grade/ English 3
Lesson and/or Unit: The Tempest, HMH Collections 2: Building a Democracy, HMH 4: A New Birth of Freedom, Informational Writing
Amount of Time: 10 Weeks
LAFS:

LAFS.1112.RI.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RI.1.2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.RI.2.5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
LAFS.1112.RI.3.8 Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
LAFS.1112.RI.3.9 Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1.c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
LAFS.1112.L.1.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
LAFS.1112.L.1.2.a Observe hyphenation conventions.
LAFS.1112.L.1.2.b Spell correctly.
LAFS.1112.L.2.3.a Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.
LAFS.1112.L.3.4.c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RL.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
LAFS.1112.W.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
LAFS.1112.W.1.2.b Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
LAFS.1112.RL.3.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
LAFS.1112.RL.2.5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
LAFS.1112.RL.1.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.1112.L.3.4.a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
LAFS.1112.W.3.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.1112.W.2.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 11-12 on page 54.)
Student Learning Objective: The student will be able to cite effective textual evidence to support informational and argumentative writing.

Objectives by Text: The student will be able to…

  • Fall Writing Interim Rewrite- incorporate writing strategies to effectively convey the controlling idea.
  • The Tempest– cite effective textual evidence to support an argument
    • The Tempest (film)- analyze an interpretation of a drama
    • The Tempest (images)- analyze an interpretation of a drama
  • “Second Inaugural Address”- evaluate a seminal US speech and analyze premises and purposes of author’s arguments.
Assessment For Learning (Summative or Formative):

  • Research paper/ Documented Essay: Informative Essay (Rewrite)/ Argument Essay (Summative)
  • Portfolio Reflection Assessment
  • Peer Assessment
  • Oral Assessment/ Discussion Participation: Tempest Performance
  • Project-based Presentation/ Assessment
  • Timed Writing Assessment
  • Standardized Test Practice Assessment
  • Analytical Reading Log/ Dialectical Journal
  • Other:

By Week:

  1. Socratic Circle- Immigration in America
  2. Published Rewrite- Fall Writing Interim
  3. Spelling Quiz Average
  4. Unit 1 Vocabulary Exam
  5. The Tempest Performances
  6. The Tempest Packet
  7. No Red Ink Quarter Exam
  8. Collaborative Blog Assignments
  9. Khan Academy SAT Practice Quarter 2
  10. ThinkCERCA Quarter 2 Average

 

Characteristics of the Exemplary Work Product/Lesson Outcome: see FSA Writing Rubric
Key/Essential Questions:

  • How can incorporating transitional strategies affect your writing? Which techniques will you utilize in your revision? Why?
  • Determine how to vary quote integration strategies. What is the point of varying your writing strategies?
  • Citing textual evidence differs when analyzing media. Indicate the major differences and decipher how one should go about making connections between media and text versions of the same work.
  • How does evaluating a seminal document differ from analyzing pieces of literature?
  • What clues should one look out for when considering the purpose and premise of an author’s argument?

 

Key/Academic Vocabulary:

HMH Collections and Sadlier- Oxford Vocabulary Workshop

The Tempest Vocabulary (see below)

Act 1: blasphemous, insolent, perdition, perfidious, sans, abhorred, endowed, allaying, ebb, usurp

Act 2: dolor, subtle, enmity, omit, prate, scurvy

Act 3: odious, diligent, precepts, vigilance, surfeited, invulnerable, supplant

Act 4: Austerely, vexations, sanctimonious, disdain, ardor, wanton, confederates, vexed, tabor

Act 5: penitent, promontory, abjure, irreparable, oracle, auspicious, expeditious

 

Materials/Items Needed:

  • HMH Collection 2 & 4 (digital or copies made by teacher)
  • Khan Academy SAT Prep
  • Grammar Bytes Handouts
    • Comma Splices/ Fused Sentences
    • Fragments
    • Irregular Verbs
  • No Red Ink
  • ThinkCERCA
Bellringer/Engage:

  • Grammar Practice
  • Reading Practice
  • Journal/ Writing Practice
  • Group Discussion
  • Vocabulary Practice
  • Other:

By Week:

  1. Irregular Verbs #3
  2. Irregular Verbs #4
  3. Irregular Verbs #5
  4. No Red Ink Baseline (Diagnostic)
  5. NRI Active/ Passive Voice
  6. NRI MLA Citation
  7. NRI Phrases and Dependent Clauses
  8. NRI Embedding Quotations
  9. NRI Parallel Structure
  10. NRI Restrictive/ Nonrestrictive Clauses
Activities: 

Week 1: Review final Unit 1 vocab worksheets. Unit 1 Quiz #4.  Writing Data Chats. Revise Socratic Circle paragraphs/ Submit final draft. William Shakespeare Conspiracy Theories Video/ Notetaking/ Exit Slip. 

Week 2: Unit 1 Vocabulary Exam. Imaginary Cities Writing Assignment.  Continue Writing Data Chats. Patterns found in Writing Scores for Fall InterimBegin The Tempest.

Week 3: Continue The Tempest (See packet). Finish Data Chats. IrregularVerbs #4. Check Introductions. Review Body Paragraphs.

Week 4: THANKSGIVING BREAK! ONLY SCHOOL TWO DAYS THIS WEEK. Check Irregular Verbs #4. Irregular Verbs #5 Quiz. Body Paragraphs cont. Review Conclusions.

Weeks 5: Body Paragraphs DUE. Review Conclusions. Review The Tempest analysis questions. Conclusions DUE! Type final essay/ Upload to digital portfolio.

Week 6: NRI Active/ Passive Voice Quiz, The Tempest Act 2 & 3/Prereading Vocabulary/ Analysis. THE HOUR OF CODE.

Week 7: NRI MLA Citation Quiz, The Tempest Act 4 & 5/Prereading Vocabulary/ Analysis. The Tempest Argument Essay.

Week 8: NRI Phrases and Dependent Clauses Quiz, The Tempest packet DUE. Compare Media: The Tempest (film/ Pictures). Practice for The Tempest production. 

Week 9: NRI Embedding Quotations Quiz, Practice for The Tempest production. Seminal document mini workshop: Background of Civil War, “Second Inaugural Address”- Lincoln p.279

Week 10: NRI Parallel Structure Quiz, The Tempest Performances. Gradebook closed.

Exit Slips:

  • Review EQ and Objectives
Differentiation Notes: Technology Integration
Honors/ Students Who Passed the FSA:

  1. New SAT Overview: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/new-sat/new-sat-tips-planning/new-sat-about-sat/v/walk-through-sat-practice-platform
  2. www.hmhfyi.com Extended Activities
  • No Red Ink
  • Khan Academy New SAT Prep
  • ThinkCERCA
  • Padlet
  • Kahoot!
  • Word Processing
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Resources
  • Graphics/Charts
  • Internet Research
  • Web Cam
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Class Dojo
  • Remind
  • Teacher Website
  • Movie/ Film
  • Other:
ESE (IEP/ 504)

  •  Extended time
ELL

  •  Extended time
Other: as stated in IEP or 504
Teacher Strategies – Best Practices

  • Student choice
  • Teacher modeling
  • Cooperative learning
  • Hands-on learning/ manipulatives utilized
  • Small group
  • Higher-ordering thinking skills
  • Real-world connections
  • Criteria charts created (student-driven; supports learning by defining and clarifying a task )
  • Rubrics created (student-centered)
  • Mentor texts
  • Anchor charts (a reference tool that “anchors” new and ongoing learning to key concepts previously introduced)
  • Research/research materials
  • Evidence of assessment for learning (teacher modifies instruction based on students’ understanding)
  • Socratic Circle/ Seminar
  • Other:

 Reading Skills

  • Annotation
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize
  • Chronology/ Timeline
  • Literary Element Analysis
  • Questioning
  • Prediction
  • TPCASTT
  • SOAPSTONE
  • Independent Reading
  • Writing before and after reading
  • Implementing pre, post, or during reading activities
  • Teaching metacognitive strategies/reading strategies
  • Classroom/Literacy library

Vocabulary Skill

  • Greek/ Latin Roots
  • Analogies
  • Context Clues
  • Synonyms/ Antonyms
  • Prefixes/ Roots/ Suffixes

Writing Skill

  • Literary Analysis
  • Pre-Writing
  • Revision/ Peer Editing
  • Reflection/ Self Analysis
  • Informational/ Explanatory
  • Persuasive/ Argumentative
  • Narrative
  • Writing workshop time
  • Teaching grammar and mechanics in context
  • Conferencing
  • Other

 HW: See REMIND posts.

Week 1: ThinkCERCA #1, Khan Academy SAT Practice

Week 2: ThinkCERCA #2, Khan Academy SAT Practice

Week 3: ThinkCERCA #3, Khan Academy SAT Practice

Week 4: ThinkCERCA #4, Khan Academy SAT Practice

Week 5: ThinkCERCA #5, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI Active/ Passive Voice

Week 6: ThinkCERCA #6, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI MLA Citation

Week 7: ThinkCERCA #7, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI Phrases and Dependent Clauses

Week 8: ThinkCERCA #8, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI Embedding Quotations

Week 9: ThinkCERCA #9, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI Parallel Structure

Week 10: ThinkCERCA #10, Khan Academy SAT Practice, NRI Restrictive/ Nonrestrictive Clauses

English 2: Quarter 4 Lesson Plans

Teacher:           Ms. Ellis                                               Robert Morgan Educational Center
Grade Level & Subject:10th Grade/ English 2
Lesson and/or Unit: Digital Textbook: HMH Collection 6: Hard-Won LibertyThe Jungle by Upton Sinclair
Amount of Time: 10 Weeks
 
LAFS:

LAFS.910.RI.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.910.RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
LAFS.910.RI.2.5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
LAFS.910.RI.2.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
LAFS.910.RI.3.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
LAFS.910.W.1.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.c Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.L.2.3.a Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian’s Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
LAFS.910.L.2.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
LAFS.910.L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
LAFS.910.L.3.5.a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
LAFS.910.L.3.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
 Learning Focus: Analyze author motivations and historical contexts.

Student Learning Objective: The student will be able to read Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle and utilize their critical analysis skills to understand character motivations, the author’s purpose and the time period that influenced the writer’s text. Students will also be able to make real-life connections between the early 1900s and present- day corruption in the United States.

Assessment For Learning (Summative or Formative): 

  • Research paper/ Documented Essay: Analytical Essay (Summative)
  • Portfolio Reflection Assessment
  • Peer Assessment
  • Oral Assessment/ Discussion Participation
  • Project-based Presentation/ Assessment
  • Timed Writing Assessment
  • Standardized Test Practice Assessment
  • Analytical Reading Log/ Dialectical Journal
  • Other:

By Week:

  1. FSA Television Packet
  2. Narrative Writing Peer Review Session
  3. Playlist Presentations
  4. Socratic Circle- The Jungle
  5. Thank -You Letter
  6. Vocabulary Charades Game
  7. Metamorphosis Inspired Narrative
  8. The Jungle  Role Sheets
  9. The Jungle Booklet
  10. Finalized Digital Portfolio
Characteristics of the Exemplary Work Product/Lesson Outcome:

 see FSA Writing rubric

Key/Essential Questions: How is Yurgis’ life representative of present-day immigrant communities in America?

 

Key/Academic Vocabulary: (See weekly daily Starts Words)
Materials/Items Needed: The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, Google Drive
Bellringer/Engage:

  • Grammar Practice (No Red Ink Quizzes)
  • Journal/ Writing Practice (Write Starts)
  • Vocabulary Practice (Write Starts)
  • Other:

Write Starts Vocab./ No Red Ink (NRI)

 

Activities: 

Week 31: Bellringer (Weekly Inspiration, lacerate, vociferous).  The Metamorphosis Narrative Assignment. Narrative Writing Notes/ Examples. No Red Ink Pronoun Antecedents Practice.  No Red Ink Restrictive & Nonrestrictive Clauses Quiz.

  • READING TEST/ Reflections on Performance

Week 32: Bellringer (Weekly Inspiration, narrative w/ 20 previous BR words). No Red Ink Commas for Formatting Practice. Begin Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. No Red Ink Pronoun Antecedents Quiz. 

Week 33: Bellringer (Weekly Inspiration, Political Leanings: If you were to vote for President this morning, who would you vote for? Why? Once you know who you’d vote for, write an argumentative paragraph convincing someone to also vote for your desired candidate. Utilize 5 of your previous vocabulary words). Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. No Red Ink Commas for Clarity Practice.  .  No Red Ink Commas for Formatting Quiz.

Week 34: Bellringer (Weekly Inspiration: How would you change education so that school isn’t a lock as Suli stated in his video?, Positive Street Art: Write a reflective response on the Preceding Ted Talk. How can street art be better utilized here in South Florida?). Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. No Red Ink Appositive Phrases Practice.  No Red Ink Commas for Clarity Quiz.

Week 35: Bellringer (Weekly InspirationTolerance: Do you agree with Sarah’s approach to peace-keeping? Explain with evidence from the video). Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. No Red Ink Capitalizing & Formatting Titles Practice.    

Week 36: Bellringer (Weekly InspirationThe Power of Poetry: Write a five minute poem about how it feels to live within your own body. Are you comfortable? Let us into your world). Finish Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. Thank- You Letter Assignment.

Week 37: Bellringer ( Weekly InspirationKid President Pep Talk: Do you think Robby Novak’s advice is helpful? Why/ Why not? How can you incorporate Novak’s advice?). Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle– Final Project due May 26/27.   Work on Digital Portfolio (add certificates, final essays/ projects, etc.)

Week 38: May 30th= Memorial Day, Bellringer (Reflect on Yearly Goals, Ms. Ellis’ Yearly Survey). Class Celebrations (June 1/2). Finalize Digital Portfolios (add certificates, final essays/ projects, etc.)

Week 39: LAST WEEK OF SCHOOL.  Celebrate! Bellringer (Plan: How Can I Continue to Grow Intellectually Over the Summer?). Educational Film.

Differentiation Notes: Technology Integration
Honors

  1. www.hmhfyi.com Extension activities
  • HP Tablets
  • One Drive
  • One Note Class Notebook
  • No Red Ink
  • ThinkCERCA
  • Padlet
  • Kahoot!
  • Word Processing
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Resources
  • Graphics/Charts
  • Internet Research
  • Web Cam
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Class Dojo
  • Remind
  • Teacher Website
  • Movie/ Film
  • Other:
ESE (IEP/ 504)

  •  Extended time
ELL

  •  Extended time
Other: Specified in IEP or 504 plan.
Teacher Strategies – Best Practices

  • Student choice
  • Teacher modeling
  • Cooperative learning
  • Hands-on learning/ manipulatives utilized
  • Small group
  • Higher-ordering thinking skills
  • Real-world connections
  • Criteria charts created (student-driven; supports learning by defining and clarifying a task )
  • Rubrics created (student-centered)
  • Mentor texts
  • Anchor charts (a reference tool that “anchors” new and ongoing learning to key concepts previously introduced)
  • Research/research materials
  • Evidence of assessment for learning (teacher modifies instruction based on students’ understanding)
  • Socratic Circle/ Seminar
  • Other:

Reading Skills

  • Annotation
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize
  • Chronology/ Timeline
  • Literary Element Analysis
  • Questioning
  • Prediction
  • TPCASTT
  • SOAPSTONE
  • Independent Reading
  • Writing before and after reading
  • Implementing pre, post, or during reading activities
  • Teaching metacognitive strategies/reading strategies
  • Classroom/Literacy library

Vocabulary Skill

  • Greek/ Latin Roots
  • Analogies
  • Context Clues
  • Synonyms/ Antonyms
  • Prefixes/ Roots/ Suffixes
  • Usage

Writing Skill

  • Literary Analysis
  • Pre-Writing
  • Revision/ Peer Editing
  • Reflection/ Self Analysis
  • Informational/ Explanatory
  • Persuasive/ Argumentative
  • Narrative
  • Writing workshop time
  • Teaching grammar and mechanics in context
  • Conferencing
  • Other

 HW: See REMIND texts.

 

 

English 2: Quarter 2 Lesson Plans

Teacher:           Ms. Ellis                                               Robert Morgan Educational Center
Grade Level & Subject:10th Grade/ English 2
Lesson and/or Unit: HMH Collection 5: Absolute Power
Amount of Time: 10 Weeks
 
LAFS:

LAFS.910.RI.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.910.RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
LAFS.910.RI.2.5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
LAFS.910.RI.2.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
LAFS.910.RI.3.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
LAFS.910.W.1.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.c Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
LAFS.910.W.1.1.d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.L.2.3.a Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian’s Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
LAFS.910.L.2.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
LAFS.910.L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
LAFS.910.L.3.5.a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
LAFS.910.L.3.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
 Learning Focus: Analyze interactions between character and theme.

Student Learning Objective: The student will be able to analyze interactions between characters and theme. The student will be able to analyze representations of a scene. The student will be able to analyze historical text. The student will be able to analyze how an author draws on Shakespeare. The student will be able to make and support inferences about word choice.

Objectives by Text: The student will be able to…

  • Macbeth– analyze interactions between characters and theme.
  • “Why Read Shakespeare”- analyze the use of rhetoric in an argument.
  • Film from Macbeth on the Estate– analyze representations of a scene.
  • History from Holinshed’s Chronicles– analyze historical text.
  • “The Macbeth Murder Mystery”- analyze how an author draws on Shakespeare.
  • “5 P.M., Tuesday, August 23, 2005” – make and support inferences about word choice.

 

Assessment For Learning (Summative or Formative): 

  • Research paper/ Documented Essay: Analytical Essay (Summative)
  • Portfolio Reflection Assessment
  • Peer Assessment
  • Oral Assessment/ Discussion Participation
  • Project-based Presentation/ Assessment
  • Timed Writing Assessment
  • Standardized Test Practice Assessment
  • Analytical Reading Log/ Dialectical Journal
  • Other:

By Week:

  1. October Voice Journal
  2. Published Fall Writing Interim Rewrite
  3. November Voice Journal
  4. Make-Up Assignment
  5. December Voice Journal
  6. Prefix, Suffix, Root Booklet
  7. Macbeth Packet
  8. Macbeth Performances
  9. No Red Ink Quarter 2 Test
  10. ThinkCERCA Quarter 2 Average
Characteristics of the Exemplary Work Product/Lesson Outcome:

 see FSA Writing rubric

Key/Essential Questions: What is the use of rhetoric to analyze an argument?

 

Key/Academic Vocabulary: HMH Collection 5 & Write Starts

rhetoric, iambic pentameter

 (See weekly daily Write Starts words)

Materials/Items Needed: HMH Collection 5 (digital or copies made by teacher), Write Starts Grade 10
Bellringer/Engage:

  • Grammar Practice (No Red Ink Quizzes)
  • Journal/ Writing Practice (Write Starts)
  • Vocabulary Practice (Write Starts)
  • Other:

Write Starts Vocab./ No Red Ink (NRI)

*Write Starts vocabulary and No Red Ink assignments from 1st quarter were added so we could complete them.

Week 11: Waft, Sanguine/ NRI

Week 12: Yammer, Zenith/ NRI Diagnostic

Week 13: Abrogate, Belie/ NRI Identifying Sentences and Fragments Practice

Week 14: Capricious, Delve/ NRI Iden. Sent. and Frag. Quiz, NRI Components of a Sentence #1 Practice

Week 15: Extol, Facetious / NRI Components of a Sent. #1 Quiz, NRI Components of a Sent. #2 Practice

Week 16: Garrulous, Hector/ NRI Components of a Sent. #2 Quiz, NRI Connecting Clauses w/ Colons & Semicolons Practice

Week 17: Inculcate, Jejune/ NRI Conn. Clauses w/ Colons & Semicolons Quiz, NRI punctuation w/ conjunctions practice

Week 18: Lugubrious, Magnanimous/ NRI punctuation w/ conjunctions quiz, NRI adjectives practice

Week 19: Ostensible, Perfunctory/ NRI adjectives quiz, NRI Identifying Parts of Speech #3 practice

Week 20: Resolute, Scintillate/ NRI Identifying Parts of Speech #3 quiz, NRI Commonly Confused Words #2 practice

Activities: 

Week 11: Shakespeare’s Life and Works Group Research, Group Presentations, UPDATE: Gables Stage Performance of Modernized “Julius Caesar” ( Periods 1 & 3 )

Week 12: Pep Rally (Thursday), Bellringers 26-27. ThinkCERCA #2. NRI Quiz: Finish Identifying Parts of Speech #3.  Post-Lit Notes Activity. Continue Shakespeare’s Life and Works Group Presentations. Begin reading MacbethInformational Essays- Introductions. Rewrite Fall Writing Interim Introductions.

Week 13: Bellringers 28-29. NRI Quiz: Commonly Confused Words #2. Introductions are DUE! Mid-Year Assessments on Wednesday!  Rewriting Body Paragraphs. Continue reading Macbeth (See activities in packet).

Week 14: THANKSGIVING! ONLY TWO DAYS OF SCHOOL. ASVAB test. Bellringer 30. Body Paragraphs are DUE! Work on conclusions.

Week 15: Bellringers 31-32. Conclusions are DUE! Type up entire essay using desired format. Continue Macbeth packet

Week 16: Bellringers 33-34. ThinkCERCA #6.  Review 10th Grade Mid-Year Interim Passage #1. Bellringer (Extol) Example. HOUR OF CODE.

Week 17: Bellringer 35. Review 10th Grade Mid- Year Interim Passage #2.  ThinkCERCA #7. Review “Why Read Shakespeare” by Mack in Macbeth packet. Begin Macbeth Act 1, scene 1.

Week 18: Bellringers (inculcate, jejune). ThinkCERCA #8. NRI Single vs. Plural Possessives Practice.  Review 10th Grade Mid- Year Interim Passage #3. Finish Macbeth Act 1 (Collaborative Study Groups/ Cornell Notetaking). NRI Quiz: Lists. Finish creating Digital Portfolios. (Email portfolio links to msdrellis@gmail.com)

Week 19: Bellringers (Weekly Inspiration,lugubrious, magnanimous, ostensible). ThinkCERCA #9. NRI Second Quarter Grammar Review (Your test next week will cover the following:

  • Single vs. Plural Possessives
  • Lists
  • Active/ Passive Voice
  • Commonly Confused Words #2
  • Identifying Parts of Speech #3
  • Connecting Clauses w/ Colons and Semicolons. 
  • NOTE: The review is quite long. Do not wait until the end of the week to start your practice exercises.

Review 10th Grade Mid- Year Interim Passage #4.  Review MYA Assessment Final Publication Grades. NRI Single vs. Plural Possessives Quiz. Macbeth Act 2 & 3.

Week 20: Bellringer (Weekly Inspiration, perfunctory, resolute). ThinkCERCA #10. NRI Vague Pronouns Practice. Review 10th Grade Mid- Year Interim Passage #5. NRI Second Quarter Grammar Test.Macbeth Acts 4 & 5. Choose play performance groups. Grade book Closed.

DI: HMH Close Reader: Collection 1

  • Student- Teacher Writing Conferences

Exit Slips:

  • Review daily EQ and objective
Differentiation Notes: Technology Integration
Honors

  1. www.hmhfyi.com Extension activities
  • HP Tablets
  • One Drive
  • One Note Class Notebook
  • No Red Ink
  • ThinkCERCA
  • Padlet
  • Kahoot!
  • Word Processing
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Resources
  • Graphics/Charts
  • Internet Research
  • Web Cam
  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Class Dojo
  • Remind
  • Teacher Website
  • Movie/ Film
  • Other:
ESE (IEP/ 504)

  •  Extended time
ELL

  •  Extended time
Other: Specified in IEP or 504 plan.
Teacher Strategies – Best Practices

  • Student choice
  • Teacher modeling
  • Cooperative learning
  • Hands-on learning/ manipulatives utilized
  • Small group
  • Higher-ordering thinking skills
  • Real-world connections
  • Criteria charts created (student-driven; supports learning by defining and clarifying a task )
  • Rubrics created (student-centered)
  • Mentor texts
  • Anchor charts (a reference tool that “anchors” new and ongoing learning to key concepts previously introduced)
  • Research/research materials
  • Evidence of assessment for learning (teacher modifies instruction based on students’ understanding)
  • Socratic Circle/ Seminar
  • Other:

Reading Skills

  • Annotation
  • Paraphrase
  • Summarize
  • Chronology/ Timeline
  • Literary Element Analysis
  • Questioning
  • Prediction
  • TPCASTT
  • SOAPSTONE
  • Independent Reading
  • Writing before and after reading
  • Implementing pre, post, or during reading activities
  • Teaching metacognitive strategies/reading strategies
  • Classroom/Literacy library

Vocabulary Skill

  • Greek/ Latin Roots
  • Analogies
  • Context Clues
  • Synonyms/ Antonyms
  • Prefixes/ Roots/ Suffixes
  • Usage

Writing Skill

  • Literary Analysis
  • Pre-Writing
  • Revision/ Peer Editing
  • Reflection/ Self Analysis
  • Informational/ Explanatory
  • Persuasive/ Argumentative
  • Narrative
  • Writing workshop time
  • Teaching grammar and mechanics in context
  • Conferencing
  • Other

 HW: See REMIND texts.

Week 1: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #1

Week 2: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #2

Week 3: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #3, NRI

Week 4: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #3, NRI

Week 5: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #4, NRI

Week 6: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #5, NRI

Week 7: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #6, NRI

Week 8: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #7, NRI

Week 9: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #8, NRI

Week 10: Daily Voice Journal entries, ThinkCERCA #9, NRI